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Linguine al sugo di tonno

Published on May 28, 2012 by Cara @ Due Spaghetti
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A plate of linguine al tonno. A fork is resting against the plate and there is some sprigs of Italian parsley and a glass of white wine in the background.

The long Minnesota winter is over. Spring is upon us, and the occasional hot – not warm, but hot – day has arrived. It’s time to fare il cambio di stagione nell’armadio – do the seasonal updating of the closet when we swap our fall and winter clothes with our spring and summer clothes. It’s also time to do the same with the refrigerator, making space for farmer’s market vegetables and easy summertime staples. Of all the seasons, summer is our favorite from a culinary perspective – there is so much variety, flavor, and simplicity.

But before we talk food, let’s go back to clothes. We’ve finished planning our July trip back to Italy. We’ll spend a few days in Rome with Stefano’s family, celebrating the birthdays of our young nephews Flavio and Davide and visiting some of our favorite spots in the city. We’ll probably take a day trip down to the Costiera Amalfitana and stop at our favorite places along the coast. Then, we will toss our kids and Stefano’s madre, Maria, in the car with us and head nord for a tour of northern Italy’s wine regions.

Finalizing our itinerary and booking our hotels got us thinking about what to pack. It’s hot in many Italian cities in summertime, even in the northern regions where we will be. We want clothes that are cool and practical, but fashionable, and that won’t make us look like American tourists.

Here’s a quick guide for those of you with similar ambitions:

Women, plan to bring wear lightweight dresses, skirts, and/or loose-fitting pants. Shorts are becoming more common but are still mostly reserved for sea-side locals. Pack breezy, comfortable tops. Loose fitting long-sleeves will protect you from the sun, but short-sleeved or sleeveless tops are common, too. Keep in mind that to enter a church, shoulders, mid-riff and thighs should be covered. Regulations have loosened notably in recent years, but we have seen people turned away. An easy solution is to toss a wide scarf in your bag to throw over your shoulders when entering a place of religous worship.

Guys mostly wear lightweight jeans or cotton trousers. Linen pants are common, too. Pair those with a lightweight cotton button-down or knit top. Men often wear sandals outside of the office in summertime or lightweight casual shoes. Traditionally, men do not wear shorts but that is becoming more common as summers get hotter.

Children can get by with pretty much anything. Keep it lightweight, consider a hat to cover their heads, and be mindful of the scorching sun.

Other tips:

  • Wear lightweight, natural fibers such as cotton and linen.
  • Leave your rugged hiking sandals and your rubber Crocs at home – Italians opt for more fashionable, yet still comfortable, footwear with sturdy soles that can handle the cobblestones. Sneakers are popular and a solid option all year long.
  • Shorts aren’t usually worn by adults, although some stylish shorts are becoming more common with young people.
  • Avoid baseball hats if you are over 12 years old to avoid looking like a tourist.
  • A cross-body bag is a stylish and convenient way to hang on to your possessions.
  • If your hair is long, have something to pull it up and off of your neck.
  • Don’t forget sunglasses!
  • Finally, get used to being warm and a little sweaty, plan your outings after sundown when many cities come alive, and don’t put your feet in the fountains to cool down.

Okay, back to food. Linguine al sugo di tonno, or linguini with tuna sauce, is a fantastic summertime pasta, even though it can be made all year round. Perhaps it’s the tuna, which makes us think of the sea. It is a quick and easy, tangy and delicious pasta. You can use pretty much any pasta shape, although Stefano’s father, Andrea, always insisted that it be made with linguine. Be sure to find good tuna packed in olive oil, never in water, and splurge on a can of San Marzano tomatoes.

A plate of linguine al sugo di tonno with a napkin beside it, a fork resting against the plate, and a glass of white wine and some sprigs of Italian parsley in the background.

Linguine al sugo di tonno

Yield: 4-6 servings

Linguine al sugo di tonno, or linguini with tuna sauce, is a fantastic summertime pasta, even though it can be made all year round. It is a quick and easy, tangy and delicious pasta.

Ingredients

  • 28. oz can of whole San Marzano tomatoes
  • 2 cans of tuna in olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp capers
  • 1 quarter of a medium white onion
  • 2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • Dash of dry white wine
  • Salt
  • 1 pack of linguine

Instructions

  1. Cut the onion into large pieces and sauté it in olive oil for 5 minutes or until translucent inside a large saucepan.
  2. Drain the excess olive oil from the tuna, and add it, along with the capers, to the onions. Allow the mixture to cook for a few additional minutes.
  3. Add a dash of white wine and allow it to cook off for a few minutes.
  4. Add the tomatoes, passing them through a food mill first so that they are smooth. 
  5. Allow the sauce to cook for about 30 minutes, adding salt to taste.
  6. Place a large pot of water to boil over high heat. When the water boils, add a handful of salt to it and then the linguine. Cook to al dente according to the time on the package.
  7. Drain the pasta and add it to the saucepan with the tuna sauce. Cook over low heat for a few minutes, mixing the pasta and the sauce. Serve and enjoy immediately.

Notes

You can use pretty much any pasta shape, although Stefano’s father, Andrea, always insisted that it be made with linguine. Be sure to find good tuna packed in olive oil, never in water, and splurge on a can of San Marzano tomatoes.

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