La Sicilia! A Photo-Essay

The fall colors are at their peak, and local newspaper headlines warn, Some Minnesotans Could Wake Up Saturday to a Blanket of Snow. Our Sicilian vacation is a distant memory.  With the fire place radiating warmth and and a glass of Nero d’Avola unearthing memories, we capture the sights and the flavors of our July 2014 tour of the western coast of Sicily.

Our tour of Western SicilyThe Sicilian countryside

Bed & Breakfast Mammaliturchi
Cico and Lola’s B&B Mammaliturchi on the southern Sicilian coast was so spectacular, so perfect, that it merited its own blog post.  A short walk up the beach to the dazzling white  Scala dei Turchi and a 15 minute drive to Agrigento and the magnificent Valley of the Temples, B&B Mammaliturchi is nothing short of paradise.

Scala dei Turchi

Sciacca
Sciacca is a small, medieval fisherman’s village built steeply into the rock that descends down to the sea.  At sea level, fishing boats dot the waterfront and fisheries line the streets.  Climb a steep set of stone steps, some which take you right past the doorways of local residents, and you will reach the heart of the town of Sciacca.  Souvenir shops line the main street which leads to a piazza that looks dramatically out over the Mediterranean.  Stop by the local pastry shop and try out some of the local bitter almond and ricotta-based treats.

Stefano and Luca sample local pastries in the back end of a Fiat 500-turned street art.

Stefano and Luca sample local pastries in the back end of a Fiat 500-turned street art.

 

Sean, Nonna Maria, Luca and Stefano pose for a photo in Sciacca's main piazza.

Sean, Nonna Maria, Luca and Stefano pose for a photo in Sciacca’s main piazza.

Luca and Sean descend Sciacca's city steps.

Luca and Sean descend Sciacca’s city steps.

Mazara del Vallo
Founded by the Phoenicians in the 9th century BC, Mazara del Vallo was ruled by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines among others, before finally coming under Arab control in 827 AD.   During the Arab period Mazara del Vallo was an important commercial harbour and the main gateway between Sicily and Northern Africa.  The historical center of Mazara del Vallo is  known as the Kasbah, and it boasts distinct Arab architectural influences.  It is also the best place in Italy to eat cous cous, a Northern African dish that Sicilians have adopted as their own.

Mazara del Vallo

Arab-influenced architecture in the Kasbah neighborhood of Mazara del Vallo.

Mazara del Vallo

The Kasbah, Mazara del Vallo.

Mazara del Vallo

We had delicious cous cous at Trattoria alla Kasbah in Mazara del Vallo.  (Luca is in his “cross-eyed photo-bomber” stage.)

Trapani and Erice
Trapani is known for its salt marshes, and picturesque windmills used to drain the water during the long process of drawing salt out.  It’s also where you can catch a ferry to the heralded Egadi islands, which we didn’t have time for on this trip but fully intend to return to do.  We made a quick stop to see the salt flats, gave in to curiosity and tasted it (yes, it really was salty), and then continued up, and up, and up and winding mountain to the town of Erice.

Erice is a medieval village that sits at the peak of a mountain, 750 metres (2,460 ft) above sea level.  On a clear day, you can see Tunisia and Africa’s Northern coast.  The day we visited it was anything but clear.  It felt like we’d  stepped right into a scene from Harry Potter’s Hogwarts.  In foggy, damp, cold weather we diligently trekked up the main street to Pasticceria Maria Grammatico, which we’d read on the internet had the most amazing pastries.  It is a humble pasticceria, as far as Italian pasticceria’s go, but their cannoli, genovesi and cassate were truly amazing.

San Vito lo Capo
When you live in place as cold as ours, some beach time is a must.  San Vito lo Capo is among the most beautiful beaches in all of Italy.  Located on the northwestern tip of Sicily, the winding drive through the mountains offers spectacular views of the sea below.

San Vito lo Capo

A spectacular view from above on the road to San Vito lo Capo.

San Vito lo Capo’s beach is a long stretch of soft sand that leads to a mountain in the distance.  The bright aquamarine sea is calm, warm and amazingly clear.  You could lose your wedding ring in waist deep water, look down and see it sparkling on the sea floor below.  The bright beach umbrella made for a splendid scene.

San Vito lo Capo

The beach at San Vito lo Capo.

San Vito lo Capo

The clear, calm water at San Vito lo Capo.

San Vito lo Capo

Bright umbrella dot the beach at San Vito lo Capo.

San Vito lo Capo

Sun, sand and sea at San Vito lo Capo.

San Vito lo Capo

Drammatic views at San Vito lo Capo.

Enjoying a frittata di pesce on the beach.

Enjoying a frittata di pesce on the beach at San Vito lo Capo.

Palermo
While the charm and slower pace of Sicily’s small towns offer the greatest appeal, a stop in the chaotic, complicated Palermo is worth it.  The tour of the historical city is quick, and worth the cost of one of the open-air tour buses.  A walk through the markets and the old Arab quarters is overwhelms by sight, sound and smell.  We were most drawn by Palermo’s unique foods: panelle (fritters made of chickpeas and flour), sandwiches with milza (gall bladder), and breakfast with granita al caffè and large gelato-filled brioche.

Milza

Milza – a Palermitano delicacy.

brioche con gelato

Breakfast in style in Palermo – brioche con gelato.

Cefalù
Cefalù is a charming, small town on the northern coast of Sicily.  Full of tourists in the summer months, it is delightful nonetheless with a convenient beach and lots of modern shops, Italian bars and eateries, many with lovely sea views.  We dined at Il Covo del Pirata, and loved it.  It’s location was amazing, with tables that looked right out over the water, yet it had a casual, family feel.  We ate seafood to our heart’s content.  Stop by early in the day and reserve a table with a view for dinner.

Cefalù

The town of Cefalù, seen from the beach.

DSC_0080

Cefalù

Il Covo del Pirata

The view from the restaurant Il Covo del Pirata, in Cefalù.

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Bed and Breakfast Mammaliturchi

the-terrace-at-b-b-mammaliturc

Minneapolis to Frankfurt. Frankfurt to Rome. A loud and crazy birthday party in Rome for three splendid 5-year-olds, and then off the next morning to Catania.

With Etna in the distance rising above the hilly landscape, we drove through the Sicilian inland to the Southern coast. Finally, after two or three laps around impossibly narrow roads in the tiny town of Realmonte, we arrived at our destination: Bed and Breakfast Mammaliturchi. Within 5 minutes of our arrival we knew that it was worth every minute and every mile of that long journey.

Francesco met us as the gate, showed us our parking spot, and led us around to the vast terrace on the beach-side of the home, where the view of the sparkling blue sea is breathtaking.  The sound of the waves crashing against the shore washed our tiredness and tension away.  It only got better when Francesco and his wife Loredana (affectionately known as Cico and Lola) showed us our rooms – large and breezy with a wall of windows that overlook the Mediterranean.

In a matter of minutes we shed our travel attire, donned our beachwear, and descended the stairs back to that marvelous terrace and the broad and quiet beach below to begin our vacation.

The Trip Advisor reviews of B&B Mammaliturchi were good and the photos alluring.  One never knows for sure, though, if a place rented over the internet will truly be what it claims to be.  B&B Mammalituchi did not disappoint.  In fact, it exceeded our every expectation.

B&B MammaliturchiB&B Mammaliturchi

The Home

Cico and Lola’s dazzling white stucco seaside home is trimmed in brilliant blue, a color scheme that mirrors the sand, sea and sky and that is reflected in the tasteful, modern and playful decor throughout.  Every convenience is available – parking, laundry, wi-fi, and even air conditioning, although despite visiting in July, we never needed it due to the comfortable sea breeze that gently blew through the windows at night.  The home offers direct, private access to the beach, a shower to rinse off in, and breakfast, lunch and dinner are served on the beautiful patio.

B&B MammaliturchiThe Trip Advisor reviews of B&B Mammaliturchi were good and the photos alluring.  One never knows for sure, though, if a place rented over the internet will truly be what it claims to be.  B&B Mammalituchi did not disappoint.  In fact, it exceeded our every expectation.

The Location

B&B Mammaliturchi is located on a quiet stretch of the Southern Sicilian coast.  It is a 5 minute walk along the beach to Scala dei Turchi, a fascinating geological formation of chalky white limestone cliffs, shaped in like a staircase.  Scala dei Turchi translates in English to Staircase of the Turks, and it is from here that B&B Mammaliturchi gets it’s name.  Legend has it that during the 16th century when the Ottomans expanded westward into Europe, the Turks arrived in their ships, and found it convenient to anchor up against these cliff, which served as a “staircase” for them as they debarked their ships.  When the locals saw the Turks arrive, they exclaimed in fear, Mamma li Turchi (Oh Mother, the Turks are here!)

B&B MammaliturchiB&B MammaliturchiB&B Mammaliturchi

B&B Mammaliturchi

 

The bed and breakfast is also located a mere 15 minutes by car from the city of Agrigento and the archeological site Valle dei Templi, one of the most outstanding examples of Greek architecture anywhere in the world, and one of Sicily’s main attractions.

B&B MammaliturchiB&B Mammaliturchi

Finally, it you can bear to pull yourself away from the slice of paradise that B&B Mammaliturchi offers, the charming towns of Sciacca, Mazara del Vallo, Marsala, Trapani, and Erice are a short drive away.

The Hospitality

Without question, the amazing amenities and location of B&B Mammaliturchi are matched and even surpassed by Cico and Lola’s warm and generous hospitality.  Exacting yet friendly, they offer an exceptional level of service while making guests feel like old friends.  They gave us tips and recommendations on local attractions and sites (like La Sosta, home of the most amazing pistacchio gelato ever), and they attended to our every need.

Each morning we awoke to an Italian breakfast of cappuccino, espresso, juice, toast, jam, Nutella and fresh-fron-the oven croissants are served on the terrace, where we watched the morning joggers and early beach-goers in the cool, sea-side breeze. Guests are free to explore off-site restaurants and bars for lunch and dinner, but quite frankly there is no reason to.  Cico and Lola’s generous, authentic Sicilian meals served open air on the terrace were a high point of our stay.  Featuring seafood that Lola bought fresh off of the fisherman’s boats each day, these were genuinely among the most memorable meals we’ve ever enjoyed.

B&B Mammaliturchi

A better Sicilian vacation we could not have found.  Cico and Lola are the perfect hosts in an absolutely spectacular destination.  As one Trip Advisor commentor wrote, everyone should treat themselves at least once to a B&B Mammaliturchi vacation.  We’re already contemplating when we can return.

B&B MammaliturchiB&B Mammaliturchi

 

 

 

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Insalata di polpo (Octopus salad)

Insalata di polpo

When Stefano was a child, he used to fish for polpi (octopuses) in the summer months when his family left the heat of Rome for their little house near the town of Latina along the Tyrrhenian Sea, a subdivision of the Mediterranean.

300px-Tyrrhenian_Sea_mapIf the boys went with their fathers – Stefano’s padre Andrea and uncle Zio Carlo, they took the car.  If not, they rode the 3 kilometers to the sea on their bicycles.

Because octopuses creep and crawl better than they swim, they like to congregate near rocks.  Thus, Stefano and his cousins used to stand on the pier that stretched out over low cliffs and fish for the eight-tentacled creatures.  To catch an octopus, they used a special lure called a polpara, which had a little weighted body surrounded by fish hooks.  The polpara was attached to a line, which they bobbed up and down to catch the octopus’ attention.

polpara_scatola

When a curious octopus wrapped its tentacles around the lure, they boys pulled the line up to claim their catch.  Back home, Stefano’s mamma, Maria, or his aunt, Zia Elena, cooked the octopus and made a delicious antipasto of insalata di polpo.

Insalata di polpoInsalata di polpo

Here in the land-locked upper Midwest of the United States, we fish for our octopus at the local seafood market, and enjoy the squeals of awe from our friends and family who’ve never handled or eaten this delicious sea creature.

Ingredients
serves 4

Two octopuses, approximately 500 grams or around 1 pound each.
2 carrots, or a handful of baby carrots
2 stalks celery
A bunch of flat leaf Italian parsley
Olive oil
Juice of 2 lemons
1 clove garlic
Salt

Insalata di polpoDirections
Place the octopuses and a cork from a recently opened bottle of wine into a large pot of cold water.  If you don’t have a bottle open, this is a great excuse to uncork one!  No-one knows why, but southern Italians swear that a cork in the water renders the octopus more tender.  Bring the water to a boil, and then let boil gently for 20 minutes.  Turn off heat, and allow the octopus to cool to room temperature in the water it was cooked in.

Il polpo si cuoce nell’acqua sua. 

Insalata di polpoIn the meanwhile, dice the carrots and celery finely, and the garlic super-finely.  Chop about 2 tablespoons of flat leaf Italian parsley.  Place it all together into a medium bowl.

Insalata di polpoRemove the octopus from the water and pat it dry with paper towels.  Cut into small pieces, and add it to the bowl.  Cover with extra-virgin olive oil, stir in the juice of one lemon, and salt to taste.  Let sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes for the flavors to express themselves, then serve.

Insalata di polpoInsalata di polpo

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Appetizers, Meat, Fish and Legumes, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani (Sicilian almond cookies)

Our infatuation with all things Sicilian lingers on, this weekend, it’s the delectable and fragrant almond cookie.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani

Native to the Middle East and Asia, the almond arrived in Sicily sometime around 1000 BC, and now the Italian island is one of the world’s major almond producers. Almond trees produce their fragrant, white and pale pink flowers in February, which is heralded in the southern seaside town of Agrigento by the Almond Blossom Festival. The tree nuts are harvested in the hot summer months of July and August. Across Italy, candied almonds, symbolizing love and fidelity, are given as wedding favors. In Sicily, almonds are often featured in baked goods and desserts.

Instead of calling for almond paste, these delicate cookies are made with finely ground blanched almonds, sugar, and egg whites, with a dash of vanilla flavor. The recipe was adapted from the Italian website Misya.info, where we’ve found a number of good recipes.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani

Plan ahead

  • The cookies need to be refrigerated for at least two hours before baking.
  • Superfine baker’s sugar will make a more delicate cookie.
  • A cookie press is helpful, or a pastry bag will work, as well.

Ingredients
200g (approx. 1 and 1/4 cup) blanched almonds, plus a few extra for decoration
200 g (approx. 1 cup less 1 Tbsp.) sugar, ideally superfine.
50g egg white (from 2 small eggs, or 1 and 1/2 large eggs)
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Maraschino cherries

Directions
Rinse and drain the cherries, and set aside.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Place almonds and sugar into a food processor. Pulse until you attain a fine blend of almond meal and sugar.  Add the egg white and vanilla. Process until the mixture comes together in a smooth, shiny dough.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Transfer the dough into a cookie press with no tip or cookie plate, or into a pastry bag with the tip cut off about 2 cm (3/4 inch) from the bottom. Press dallops of dough about 4 cm (1 and 1/2 inch) onto the parchment paper-lined baking tray, leaving a few centimeters of space in between each. Press a cherry or a blanched almond into the center of each cookie.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani

Refrigerate at least 2 hours or up to 12 hours before baking. Bake at 180° C, 350 °F for approximately 15 minutes, or until the cookies show just a hint of golden coloring. Let cool completely before enjoying.

Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani Pasticcini alle mandorle siciliani For an elegant touch, serve your pasticcini alla mandorle with Passito di Pantelleria, a Sicilian dessert wine made from the Muscat of Alexandria grape. Pantelleria is a volcanic island located south of Sicily, just 70 km from Tunisia. Passito is an ancient sweet wine likely made for thousands of years. At summer’s end, the grapes are hand-picked and left to dry in the sun for 30-40 days, before soft pressing and fermentation. Passito di Pantelleria has fragrant apricot, ripe fig and raisin aromas and a long, sweet finish.

 

 

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Pasta alla norma

We’ve been trip planning. This July we will return to Italy, stopping in Rome to visit family and then proceeding on to Sicily.

SiciliaSicilia

The largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily has been at the crossroads of Western civilization for over 2,500 years, due to its strategic location in the middle of Mediterranean trade routes.

Ruled at different times in history by Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Normans, French, Germans, Spanish, and finally Italians, Sicily boats a spectacular cultural heritage evident today in its architecture, music, and of course, its cuisine.

Sicily has a stunning variety of landscapes to match its cultural richness: inland mountain ranges, desert-like expanses reminiscent of the Middle East, the lava-spewing volcano Mount Etna, and pristine white sand beaches with merging with the sparkling green-blue sea.

EtnaFrom Catania to Palemo, and the cities and villages in between: Syracusa, Ragusa, Agrigento, Sciacca, Marsala, Trapani, San Vito lo Capo.  We’ll soak in the sun on some of the world’s most amazing beaches, visit stunning ancient ruins such as the Valle dei Templi and the Tempio di Segesta, and (of course) sample Sicilia’s unique culinary splendors.

Among the delicacies on our list are arancini, panelle, cous cous, insalata d’arance, caponata, ‘mpanata, pasta con le sarde, granite, paste di mandorle, cannoli, and cassata.  And obviously, seafood.  Tons and tons of it.

We capped off our afternoon of vacation planning with a Sicilian classic, pasta alla norma.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla Norma

Ingredients
Two medium eggplant
1 large (28 oz) can whole peeled tomatoes
2 cloves garlic
3 tablespoons diced onion
Dry white wine
Ricotta salata (approx 200g)
Olive oil
Flour
Salt

Directions
Slice the eggplant about 3 to 4 mm, or  1/8th inch thick.  Place them in a strainer one layer at a time, sprinkling a dusting of salt over each layer.  Place a dinner plate on top or something similar that adds weight to help press the bitter liquids.  Let them degorge for about an hour.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla NormaPasta alla Norma

While the eggplant is resting, prepare the sauce.  Dice the onion and garlic, and sauté it in olive oil.  Add the tomatoes, passing them through a food mill to render them smooth.  If you do not have a food mill, you can blend the tomatoes.  Let simmer for 45 minutes, salting to taste.  After about 30 minutes, add a dash of dry white wine.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla Norma

Return to the eggplant.  Rinse and pat the slices dry.  Dust them with flour, and then gently fry them in hot olive oil, just until golden brown.  Let them cool on paper towels to absorb the excess oil.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla NormaPasta alla Norma

Cut the eggplant into thin strips about 1 to 2 cm, or  1/2 to 3/4 inch thick.  Set aside a handful of eggplant, and add the rest to the sauce, along with a about 1/4 cup of grated ricotta salata.  Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally.

Pasta alla Norma

 

Pasta alla Norma

Bring a large pot of water to boil.  Toss your short pasta of choice – penne or rigatoni perhaps – into the water, along with a generous handful of salt.  Cook until al dente.  Transfer the pasta to a large pan.  Add the sauce (saving just little), and grate a little more ricotta salata over it all.  Stir over medium heat until the cheese melts.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla NormaPasta alla NormaServe in pasta bowls adorned with a few strips of eggplant, another grating of ricotta salata, and a dollop of sauce.

Pasta alla NormaPasta alla Norma

Pasta alla Norma

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Pasta, Rice and Grains, Recipes and Wine Pairings, When You Visit Italy | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

La Colomba – Buona Pasqua a Tutti

It’s Easter morning, and our social media is filled with pictures that our Italian family and friends have posted of their Pasqua spread: the sweet and savory Easter breakfast that Stefano’s mother makes, the delicious Neapolitan ricotta and cooked grain cake called la pastiera, lasagne, lamb, and egg-based savory dishes like torta pasqualina which is often served as picnic food on Easter Monday.

This year, we’ve added to our repertoire of Easter baking with the classic colomba, which means dove in Italian.  This fragrant, yeasty cake is like the panettone and pandoro served at Christmas, but is baked in the form of a dove.  With candied orange peel inside and a sweet, almond-sugar glaze on top, la colomba is a delicate Easter dessert.

La colombaThere are varying versions of recipes for la colomba.  Some follow the traditional method of multiple kneading and risings over a 24 hour window.  Others have found ways to expedite the process.  After a bit of research, we settled on this version from the Italian website Misya.  It takes an entire day from morning til evening, but the down time over the course of four cycles of kneading and rising allows plenty of time to prepare the rest of your Easter offerings.

Paper dove-shaped baking molds are used to achieve the traditional shape of la colomba.  Plan ahead, as these can be a bit tricky to find.  This recipe is enough for a 1 kilogram mold, or two molds of 500 grams each.  We found ours at Fante’s Kitchen Wares Shop.

La Colomba

Ingredients
For the dough
500 g (4 cups) flour  *If you can find Italian 00 flour, use it.
100 ml water
20 g (approx. 7 tsp) active dry yeast
200 g (14 Tbsp) unsalted butter
170 g (3/4 cups) sugar
5 egg yolks
30 ml (approx. 2 Tbsp) whole milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
The zest of one lemon
The zest of one orange
A pinch of salt
50 g (1/3 cup) candied orange peel (to make your own, see here)

For the glaze
2 egg whites
50 g (1/3 cup) sugar
Pearl sugar or decorators’ sugar
Raw almonds

La ColombaDirections
Stage One
Dissolve the yeast in 100 ml warm water. Stir until it becomes a thick paste.  Add 150 g (1 and 1/2 cups) of the flour, and stir together until the flour is absorbed.  Use your hands to shape the dough into a smooth ball. Place the dough into a bowl of warm water, cover, and let rest for 30 minutes.  Upon return, the dough will double in size and be floating.

Stage Two
While the dough is bathing in water, prepare for the second stage.  In a large bowl, mix together the remaining 350 g (3 and 1/2 cups) of flour, the sugar, egg yolks, 100 g (7 Tbsp) of the butter, salt, vanilla, and the lemon and orange zest.  Slowly add up to 30 ml (2 Tbsp) milk to bring the mixture together.  Take the ball of dough out of the tub of water, shake the excess water off, and add it to the mixture.  Mix the doughs together.  Turn the new dough over onto a floured work surface, and knead it gently until smooth.  The dough will be a bit sticky.  Return to a bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 1 hour.

Stage Three
Uncover the dough and add 50 g (3 and 1/2 Tbsp) soft butter.  Place the dough into a mixing bowl and mix on low speed with a dough attachment for 10 minutes.  Or, knead by hand.  Return the dough to the bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place for 4 hours.

Stage Four
Uncover the dough, which will have doubled in size.  Add the remaining 50 g (3 and 1/2 Tbsp) of soft butter and the candied orange peel.  Mix for 15 minutes on low speed with the dough attachment, or knead by hand. Turn the dough out into the dove mold(s), using your hands to spread it to the borders of the mold.  Leave the dough in a warm place to rise for 2 to 3 hours more, until it reaches the top edges of the mold.

Stage Five
Preheat the oven to 190o C (375oF). Prepare the glaze by beating the egg whites with the regular sugar until it becomes a frothy mixture. Brush the glaze abundantly over the surface of the dough. Arrange almonds over the entire surface area, and finish with a generous sprinkling of pearl sugar.  Bake at 190o C (375oF) for 10 minutes.  Then, turn the oven down to 100o C (350oF) and bake for 30 more minutes.

Let cool, and enjoy.

Posted in Desserts and Baked Goods, Holiday Recipes, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged | 3 Comments

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

Blood Orange, Bufala and Pomegranate Salad

Everything you see, said Sophia Loren, I owe to spaghetti.

Sophia Loren

Beata lei.  Lucky her.  The carbohydrate load of a heaping plate of pasta asciutta doesn’t do quite as much for the rest of our curves.  Every once in a while, especially as the spring arrives and we shed our layers of clothing and begin to think of summer, a salad is called for.This post really wasn’t supposed to be.  We were supposed to be writing right now about Tagliatelle al tartufo.  Except that yesterday evening, Rocky, our new 18-month-old adoptee Great Dane, ate all of Stefano’s hand-made tagliatelle as they lay spread out on the kitchen counter waiting to be tossed into a pot of boiling water.

Rocky1Thus, the salad post.  It’s actually a well-times recipe.  The late winter blood oranges are still around.  The salad’s bright colors and freshness invokes the spring months that are just around the corner.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

Ingredients
Mixed greens
Red and green endive
Toasted bread
Blood oranges
Mozzarella di bufala
Pomegranate
Olive Oil
Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions
Cut slices of rustic bread into cubes.  Toast in the oven until one side is crispy and then turn them over and do the same to the other side.  Let cool.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranatoChop the endive and place it along with the mixed greens a large salad bowl, or on individual serving plates.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranatoInsalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranatoPeel and section the blood oranges, paying attention to eliminate as much as the pith as possible.  Add them to the greens.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

Toss the toasted bread on top.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranatoDeseed the pomegranate and sprinkle the seeds onto the salad.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranatoDrizzle olive oil, sprinkle salt and grind black pepper on top.  Toss, and enjoy.

Insalata alle arance rosse, bufala e melogranato

 

 

Posted in Recipes and Wine Pairings, Vegetables and Salads | Tagged , | 8 Comments