Strudel di mele

Last weekend our blogger friend Frank from Memorie di Angelina messaged us on the Due Spaghetti Facebook page asking whatever had become of us.  Had we quit blogging?  It’s been SO long since we’ve published a post!  July 28th, in fact.

We haven’t stopped cooking, of course.  But life became ridiculously busy for a few months, and the time simply was not there for photo taking, photo editing, and writing.  The arrival of autumn and the apple harvest changed that.

Strudel di MeleCara’s computer does a funny thing – every time she connects it to an LCD projector, which she does often at work, it changes the desktop image to a photo of a slice of torta di mele, apple cake, the subject of a blog post from autumns past.  Her computer executes this backdrop change entirely of its own will, with no human solicitation, as technology gadgets sometimes do.  This week, it served as a hint that it is time to do some baking.

Torta di mele

There is nothing better than baking with apples during the fall season.  Apples are native to our resident state of Minnesota, and people make weekend pilgrimages to local apple orchards for fruit to transform into apple pies, apple crisp and apple butter.

In Italy, apples are cultivated in all regions but are particularly common to Valle d’Aosta, Piemonte, Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige.  In fact, when we toured Northern Italy in summer of 2011, we were surprised to discover what looked like vineyards from a distance were actually row after row of apple trees.

Strudel di mele, a distant cousin to baklava, is a recipe with Byzantine origins.  The word strudel is borrowed from German, and it follows that the recipe is native to northern Italian regions which were once part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Strudel di meleGolden delicious apples are the preferred baking variety in Italy for their delicate flavor and ability to maintain structure during cooking.  However, feel free to experiment with your favorite apple.  Sultana raisins, pine nuts and a dash of rum give this baked dessert sophistication and an subtle Middle Eastern  quality.

We adapted this recipe from one we found in the Cooking section of the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera.  The crust was good, but not perfect.  In future versions we will experiment with a lighter and flakier crust.  If you have a favorite strudel crust recipe, please share it with us!

Strudel di mele

Ingredients
For the crust
300g (just over 2 cups) flour
50g (about 1/4 cup) sugar
100 ml (a little less than 1/2 cup) milk
1 egg
75 grams (just over 5 Tablespoons) butter, plus a few tablespoons for melting

For the filling
1 kg (2.2 lbs) apples.  We used 6 medium Golden Delicious apples
70 grams (about 5 Tablespoons) butter
2 dashes of rum
50 g (about 1/2 cup) bread crumbs.  We substituted with the soft, inside part of day-old crusty rustic bread.
100 g (about 1/2 cup) sugar
100g (just over 1/2 cup) sultana or golden raisins
50 grams (just under 1/2 cup) pine nuts
A dash of cinnamon

Other
Parchment paper

Directions
Prepare the dough for the crust by adding the sugar, 75 grams of butter, egg and milk to the flour, either in a small mixing bowl, or on a smooth counter top and forming a well in the mound of flour.  Mix vigorously until the dough is a smooth ball.  Cover with a dishcloth and set aside.

Strudel di mele

Strudel di mele

Peel and core the apples, halve them, and slice them thinly.  We used a mandolin slicer on the second-largest width setting for uniform slices.

Torta di melePlace the apples in a skillet with 70 grams of butter, and cook over medium heat until the butter is melted, stirring occasionally.  Add two generous dashes of rum, and allow the liquor to cook off.  Add the sugar, breadcrumbs, raisins and pine nuts, and cook together over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes.  Remove from heat and set aside.

Torta di meleTorta di mele

Sprinkle flour onto a smooth work surface and roll out the dough into a rectangle of about .5 cm, (1/5 inch) thickness.  Place parchment paper onto the surface of a baking sheet, and brush a thin layer of melted butter on top of it.  Carefully transfer the sheet of dough onto the parchment paper.  The dough will extend over the edges of the baking sheet.

Torta di meleTorta di mele

Transfer the filling onto the dough and spread it lengthwise over the center of the dough.  Fold the shorter sides of the dough up over the filling, and then carefully wrap the longer sides over the filling.  Seal the dough with a bit of milk, brush melted butter over the top, and perforate the dough with a few air-holes to allow the steam out while cooking.

Torta di mele

Bake at 180° C (350 F°) for about 45 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.  Allow the strudel to cool.  Serve warm or at room temperature, with a dusting of powdered sugar on top.

If you wish, accompany with an Italian Moscato such as Paolo Saracco’s Moscato d’Asti, which compliments the sweetness and tartness of the apples.

Torta di meleTorta di meleUna mela al giorno leva il medico di torno.
An apple a day keeps the doctor away.

 

Posted in Desserts and Baked Goods, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Pollo alle olive

This weekend in July has been unusual on two fronts.  First, we’re home with almost nothing on our schedules.  Second, the weather has turned unseasonably cool and crisp – jeans and sweaters weather, reminiscent of fall.  This combination of factors put us into a cooking mood.  As if meant to be, we turned on the radio to listen to a weekly food and cooking program to find the host interviewing a Rome-based food historian and journalist about where to find authentic dishes despite a changing Roman food culture.

Pollo alle olive

Inspired, we began to page through our Italian cookbooks, particularly one called Cucina Romana by Sara Manuelli, pondering what to prepare for Sunday lunch.  We flagged several recipes to make in the coming weeks and months: a pesto from Frascati made with potatoes, tomatoes, almonds and ricotta; oven-baked ricotta with zucchini flowers; ciambelle al vino to dip into a chilled glass of white wine; and pizza, prosciutto e fichi, if fresh ripe figs find their way to Minneapolis in late summer.  We also came across a tried and true recipe -  pollo alla romana, or Roman-style chicken, whereby pieces of free-range chicken are stewed in tomatoes and red bell peppers until the meat separates from the bone.

pollo alle olive

There was a chicken in our freezer waiting to be put to use.  We didn’t have red peppers, but there were black olives in the refrigerator.  A few online searches later we came across several recipes for pollo alle olive.  Similar to pollo alla romana, the chicken is cooked slowly in a tomato sauce rendered tangy and flavorful by good black olives, white wine and and Italian herbs.  It made for a  succulent Sunday pranzo enjoyed outdoors on cool but sunny Sunday afternoon in July.

Pollo alle olive

Ingredients
1 free-range chicken
Olive oil
Three cloves garlic
One 28 oz. (800 g) can of whole tomatoes, preferably San Marzano
Approximately 20-30 quality black olives, pitted
One tablespoon capers, rinsed
A dash of dry white wine
Sage
Thyme
Oregano
Salt

Pollo alle olive

Directions
Prepare the chicken by removing the skin and cutting the breasts and thighs into small pieces.  We had an extra package of drumsticks (legs), so we added them for good measure.

Heat a few tablespoons of oil in the bottom of a large fry pan.  Slice the garlic into halves or quarters and add it to the oil along with the capers and herbs.  Gently brown the chicken in the oil for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally so that all sides cook.  Salt the chicken to taste as it is browning, remembering that the olives will contribute to the saltiness of the dish, as well.  Add the white wine and allow it to evaporate.  Finally, add the tomatoes (ideally pressing them through a food mill to produce a smooth sauce), and then the olives.

Pollo alle olive

Allow the chicken to simmer uncovered slowly for 45 minutes or more.  It is ready when the sauce thickens and the meat pulls away from the bone.  We served pollo alle olive in piatti fondi (pasta dishes) due to its sauciness.

Pollo alle olive

Posted in Meat, Fish and Legumes, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

Crostata alla Nutella

Today’s recipe is an tribute to Nutella, that delicious, chocolate-hazelnut spread meant for kids but secretly loved by adults, too.

Crostata alla Nutella

Nutella was originally a solid chocolate and hazelnut creation, and later a spread named Supercrema, created in the 1940s by Pietro Ferrero, founder of the Italian chocolate company Ferrero.  At that time, cocoa was difficult to obtain due to rationing during World War II.  Hazelnuts, however, were abundant in his hometown of Alba in the Langhe region of Italy, and in a case of necessity driving ingenuity Ferrero stretched his chocolate recipe by incorporating them.  Nutella as we know it was created in the 1964s by Ferrero’s son, Michele, who envisioned a product that could be sold worldwide.

Crostata alla NutellaIn the 1970s when Stefano, his brother Marco and his sister Debora were growing up, Nutella was a special treat.  Their mother, Maria, bought it every once in a while and spread a paper-thin layer onto fette biscottate or even better yet a piece of crusty bread as an after school snack, and when she wasn’t looking, they would sneak spoonfuls of Nutella straight from the jar.  At that time, Nutella was sold in glass containers with cartoon characters screen-printed onto them.  Once the Nutella was gone, the container could be washed and used as a drinking glass.  As children, Stefano, Marco and Debora each had their own designated Nutella glass in the cupboard.

Crostata alla Nutella

Over time, hundreds of desserts featuring Nutella have been created.  One of the most simple, and a favorite in our household, is crostata alla nutella.  This is a variation of the classic Italian jam crostata, or crostata alla frutta, and it uses the same short-bread style crust as torta della nonna.  We often make it as a children’s dessert to accompany a more sophisticated dessert for adults, and it never fails that the grown ups grab a slice, too.

Crostata alla Nutella

Torta alla Nutella
for a 9″-11″ tart pan

Ingredients
200 g (1 and 1/2 cup) flour
80 g (1/3 cup) sugar
80 g (5 and 1/2 Tbsp) unsalted butter, cubed
1/2 pouch of Pane Angeli lievito per i dolci, or 2 tsp. baking powder
1 egg
Zest of 1 lemon
One small jar of Nutella (13 oz. or 400 g)

Directions
Prepare the pasta frolla short-bread crust by placing the flour onto a firm, smooth work surface, or into a large bowl.  Add the sugar and pane angeli or baking powder, and mix.  Gather the dry ingredients into a mound and form a well in the middle.  Add the egg, cubes of butter and lemon zest, and working quickly with your fingers, work the wet ingredients into the flour mixture.  Mix by hand until the dough forms a homogenous, smooth ball.  Cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Crostata alla Nutella

Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C), and butter and flour a 9-11 inch or 26-28 cm. fluted-edge tart pan.  If you cannot find a tart pan, a round spring-form pan or a pie plate, will also work, although it is helpful to have a pan with a removable bottom.

Take 1/3 of the dough and set it aside.  You will use this later for the lattice on top.  Roll out the remaining 2/3 of the pasta frolla and lay it into the tart pan, pressing the bottom and sides tightly against the edges.  Spread the Nutella smoothly onto the crust.

Crostata alla Nutella

Roll out the remaining dough, and cut strips that are about 1/2″ or 1 cm. wide.  You can use a fluted pastry cutter to make pretty edges if you have one.  I was cooking in my mom’s kitchen and did not have mine with me, and as you can see straight edges work just fine, too.  Arrange the strips of dough on top of the crostata in a lattice pattern, and pinch the edges together.

Bake for approximately 45 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown.  Take care to not burn the Nutella.  Let cool, and enjoy.

Crostata alla NutellaCrostata alla NutellaCrostata alla Nutella

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Fettuccine ai funghi

Sometimes, on a whim, Stefano brings home flowers, or dark chocolate, or a great, musty-smelling French cheese.  His most recent find, however, was a triumphant one.  Morels.  Spugnole in Italian.

MorelsThese crinkly, cavernous, conical mushrooms emerge in spring and are harvested into early summer.  Their texture is meaty and their flavor nutty, yet delicate at the same time.  Morels are best in delicate recipes that afford them center-stage.

MorelsStefano’s “find” was reminiscent of his childhood, when his mom and dad and aunts and uncles brought the children along to andare per funghi, or search for mushrooms, in the selva di Paliano, a protected natural park near his father’s hometown of Paliano, in southern Lazio south of Rome.  Stefano’s aunt Elena’s brother-in-law Pietro knew which mushrooms were edible and which weren’t.  To be sure though, Stefano’s parents Maria and Andrea always ate any dishes prepared with hand-picked wild mushrooms first, and waited until the next day to let Stefano, his brother Marco and his sister Debora try them.

Fettuccine ai funghiFettuccine ai Funghi

Ingredients
for 4-6 servings

Morels, or any mushroom of your choice
2 cloves of garlic
Olive oil
Dry white wine
Salt
One package of fettuccine, preferably egg-noodle (approx. 500 g or 16 oz)
Flat leaf Italian parsley, diced

Directions
Rinse the morels quickly, only if needed. Chop the stems and caps into large pieces, and set aside. Cover the bottom of a sauce pan with olive oil. Quarter the garlic cloves lengthwise, sauté them in the oil over medium-low heat until golden brown, remove and discard them.  Add a generous dash of dry white wine the mushrooms.  Allow the mushrooms to simmer uncovered for 5 minutes over medium heat.  Add a bit more wine and 1/4 of a stick of butter.  Cover and allow to cook for 10 more minutes, stirring occasionally.  Turn off heat and let rest.

Fettuccine ai funghiBring a large pot of water to boil.  Add a heaping handful of salt, and the fettuccine.  Cook to al dente according to the instructions on the package.  Drain well and return to the pot.  Pour the mushrooms and liquid over the pasta and mix well.  Serve in pasta bowls with a sprinkling of flat leaf Italian parsley on top.

Posted in Pasta, Rice and Grains, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Alla salute!

Italian food, we were once told, is the most unhealthy of all ethnic food in the U.S..  Worse than Asian food, worse than Mexican food.  Sadly, in America and other countries outside of Italy, it is true.  Italian food has become synonymous with pasta, cheese, tomatoes and meat.  When we think Italian, we think heavy meals of gigantic portions, and rich desserts.

Insalata mozzarella, tonno e pomodoroAt a recent party, the hostess, holding a plate full of catered Italian-American food and talking to us about Due Spaghetti, asked us how we manage eat Italian and yet stay so thin.  We didn’t know how to answer her.  “This isn’t Italian food.” would not have been polite, despite being true.  We were actually eating Italian-American food.  The difference is substantial.  While Italian cuisine certainly includes some rich dishes, authentic Italian food, especially that originating from the southern Italian regions, is among the world’s healthiest.

Insalata mozzarella, tonno e pomodoroThe much-acclaimed Mediterranean diet was inspired by the culinary traditions of Southern Italy, Spain, Greece and Morocco, where olive oil, vegetables, fruit, legumes, and whole grains serve as the foundation of people’s diet.  Fish and seafood is also a staple of the Mediterranean diet. Consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), and wine is moderate, while meat and meat products are rare.

In Italy meals are balanced.  A carb-based first course of pasta or rice is followed by a protein-based second course of fish, eggs, or lean meat.  Consumption of red meat is infrequent, portions are small, vegetables are abundant, and dessert is a simple fresh fruit.  Where that diet still prevails, people boast among the highest longevity and the lowest disease rates in the world.  It is a far cry from the Italian-American fare that has become known around the globe as Italian cuisine.

In the warm summer months, meals are often light and simple in Italy.  The piatto unico, or single course meal, is increasingly common for lunch and sometimes for dinner.  One of our favorites is a refreshing summer salad made of lattuga (romaine), fresh corn, tuna, mozzarella and tomatoes.  It is light, yet filling enough to make a meal of.

Insalata mozzarella, tonno e pomodoroDSC_0077

Ingredients
(quantities are all as desired)

Hearts of Romaine
Canned whole kernel corn
Fresh mozzarella
Tuna, in olive oil
Roma tomatoes
Salt
Ground pepper
Olive oil

Directions
Chop the romaine, tomatoes, and mozzarella into bite-sized pieces, and place into a salad bowl.  Drain the olive oil off of a can or more of tuna, and add it to the salad.  Add sea salt, ground black pepper and a few tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil if desired.  Toss, and enjoy.

oInsalata mozzarella, tonno e pomodoroDSC_0074

Posted in Recipes and Wine Pairings, Vegetables and Salads | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Supplì al telefono

We’ve had this recipe and accompanying photos ready for a week now, but the time and more importantly the inspiration to write a post around them have been missing.

Supplì al telefono

It arrived last night in the form of an 11-month-old bundle of smiles, curiosity and drool named Penelope.  She was our guest at dinner, along with her parents Veronica and Lauren, and our mutual friends Emily and Ben.  It was a brilliant evening to benefit the amazing students and teachers at Cara’s school, with a menu of some of our favorite seafood dishes:

Antipasto misto di pesce (Mixed seafood appetizers)
Riondo Prosecco
Pennette al salmone (Pennette in a creamy salmon sauce)

Lageder Pinot Nero
Pesce spada al cartoccio (Baked Swordfish with seafood)

Falanghina Terredora
Insalata mista (Baby Salad Greens)
Tiramisù al limoncello (Limoncello Tiramisù)

Limoncello
Caffè e Digestivi (Espresso and Digestif)

But, back to Penelope.  She was busy and happy.  She explored the living room, engaged playfully with the adults, and snacked on food from her own little portable, spill-proof bowl. Her parents took turns holding her, and before any of us realized it, 5 hours had passed.

It reminded us of when our oldest, Sean, was a baby.  We still lived in Rome then, and didn’t think twice about bringing him out with us where ever we went.  He was content to observe the world from his stroller or ride along in the baby carrier worn by his mamma or papà.

Some of our favorite spots to take him were Campo de’ Fiori, where we could content him with a piece of pizza rossa, the hill-town of Frascati in the Castelli Romani, or the village of Nemi, perched high above the volcanic lake Lago di Nemi, just south of Rome.  Nemi is famous for its berries, frutti di bosco, and especially the miniature wild strawberries that are bursting with flavor.  In summertime, it was a cool reprieve from the heat of Rome.  We’d take a stroll through Nemi’s narrow streets, stopping for a gelato alla crema with berries on top.  We’d bring along a banana and some Biscotti Plasmon, Italy’s quintessential baby biscuits, and ask the barman to add milk and blend up a smoothie for Sean.

Closer to home, Pizzeria Pizza & Fichi, at Via Alenda, 26 in Rome’s Giardinetti neighborhood was a favorite spot for Roman-style pizzas, filetti di baccalà and supplì, made by our friends Fabrizio, Massimo, Carmela and their mom at the family business.  We’d choose an outdoor table underneath a broad umbrella, order our pizzas, and feed Sean while we waited for our food.  Like clockwork, he would fall asleep by the time our pizza arrived.  We’d recline his stroller seat, place him back into it, and enjoy our pizza while he slept.

Supplì al telefono are a rice croquette fritter found on the antipasti menu in pizzerie all across the city.  The rice is cooked with a bit of tomato sauce, sometimes with ground beef, and let to cool.  Then, it is molded into an egg-like shape, and a piece of mozzarella is pushed into the middle of it before it is breaded and fried.  When the supplì is broken open, the melted mozzarella stretches from one piece to another, resembling the cord on an old-fashioned telephone.

Ingredients
for 8 supplì

500 grams Arborio, Vialone Nano or Carnaroli rice
1 large can of whole tomatoes (500 grams or 28 0z)
Ground beef, approximately 250 grams or 1/2 lb.
Onion
Olive oil
Salt
Fresh mozzarella
4 eggs
Breadcrumbs
Flour
Vegetable, peanut or olive oil for frying

Directions
Prepare the sauce by dicing 1/4 of a small-medium onion, and sautéing in olive oil over medium heat.  Add the ground beef and brown it slowly, using a spatula to crumble the meat finely.  Add the tomatoes, passing them through a food mill.  Add a splash of water or red wine if too thick, and allow it to simmer for at least 45 minutes.  Salt to taste.

Cook the rice in abundant boiling water with a handful of salt tossed in, just as you would cook pasta, according to the cooking time on the package.  When the rice is done, drain off the water using a strainer.  Add the rice to the sauce and stir well until it is evenly coated.  Place onto a baking tray or into a large baking dish and spread it out in order to facilitate cooling.

Once the rice is cool, you are ready to assemble and fry the supplì.  Add your oil several inches deep into a pan suitable for frying, and place it over medium heat.

Supplì al telfono

Fill a dish with flour, another with breadcrumbs, and a final one with the eggs, which you will beat slightly.  Cut 8 small pieces of mozzarella to stuff inside the supplì.

Wet you hands to make it easier to handle the rice.  With your hands, scoop enough rice to make an egg-sized supplì.  Mold it into an oblong shape, and using your thumb make an indent in the center.  Fill the indent with a piece of mozzarella, and then enclose the mozzarella with rice so that it is tucked well inside.

Supplì al telefono

Dust the supplì in flour, dip it into the egg and rotate it so that it is well-coated, and then finally roll it in the breadcrumbs.  Some recipes suggest repeating a second coating of egg and breadcrumbs.  We tried it both ways and preferred a single layer, but you may wish to experiment and decide which option works best for you.

Supplì al telefonoSupplì al telefono

Gently place each supplì into the hot oil and fry until it takes on a rich brown hue.  Remove from the oil and set on absorbent paper towels.  Allow to cool slightly, and enjoy with a Birra Moretti.

Supplì al telefono

Posted in Appetizers, Pasta, Rice and Grains, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

Costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito

Easter food is so good that we’ve been celebrating all week long!

Costolette di abbaccio a scottaditto

The subject of tonight’s meal, costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito, is a storied Roman dish that is savored on Pasqua or Pasquetta, and throughout the year. But before we tell that story let’s take time for an Italian lesson, because it will all make much more sense then.

Costolette is a culinary term that means “chops” as in pork chops, lamb chops, etc.  It comes from the noun costola (singular) and costole (plural) which mean ribs – an anatomical term to describe this human and animal body part.  The diminutive suffix -etta, which indicates smallness, in this case distinguishes costoletta (singular) or costolette (plural) as the cooked meat that we eat – i.e. chops.

Abbacchio means suckling lamb.  This is not a common concept in many nations, so bear with us.  Agnello is the Italian word for lamb, and in fact there are many recipes for agnello.  However, abbacchio is something special, especially in Rome.  An abbacchio is a young lamb that has only been nourished with its mother’s milk when it is butchered.  The young lamb usually weighs 4-6 kilos and is just over one month old.

The etymology of the word abbacchio is curious – some have traced it to the Latin expression ad baculum, which means “near the stick” which may represent the stick to which the mother lamb was tied, or which may represent the stick that in ancient times was used to butcher the lamb.  Even today, the slang term abbacchiato is present in Roman dialect, meaning “beaten down.”

Finally, scottadito is a descriptor made up of two Italian words: scotta, and ditoScotta means “hot,” or “scalding.” Dito means “finger.” So, put together, scottadito means “finger-scalding.”  These chops are to be eaten with your hands, while the protruding rib bones are still so hot that they burn your fingers.

So, costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito.  Finger-scalding suckling lamb chops.  It sounds better in Italian, doesn’t it?

Whatever language you name it with, costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito is delicious – the gamey flavor of lamb is tempered by a rub of rosemary, sage and garlic.  It can be grilled, or pan-seared, as we prepared it.  To be truly traditional, serve them with oven-roasted potatoes.

Ingredients
One rack of lamb chops.  If you can find suckling lamb, this is ideal.  If not, lamb chops will work.
Rosemary
Sage
Garlic
Olive oil
Fingerling or Yukon Gold potatoes
Salt
Crushed red pepper (optional)

Costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito

Directions

Carefully cut the rack of lamb into separate chops.  We also chose to trim the excess fat, but that is a matter of preference.  Mince the needles from a few sprigs of rosemary, the leaves from a small bunch of sage, and a few cloves of garlic.  Spread the chops onto a baking sheet, drizzle olive oil over both sides of them, rub the herbs onto the meat, and salt to taste.  Add crushed pepper if you like a little heat. Splash them with some dry red wine, and let rest.

Costolette di abbacchio alla scottaditoCostolette di abbacchio alla scottadito

In the meanwhile, heat the oven to 350° F / 180° C.  Peel your potatoes and cut them into small pieces.  If you are using fingerling potatoes, simply scrub them and leave whole with the skin on.  Place the potatoes into a baking dish, drizzle them with olive oil, add the needles from one sprig of rosemary, and salt well.  Bake for 30-45 minutes, stirring them occasionally, until the potatoes are cooked inside and crispy on the outside.

Roasted Potatoes

While the potatoes are baking, return to the lamb chops.  Either grill the chops, or heat a few tablespoons of olive oil in a skillet and sear them for a few minutes on each side.  If you use a skillet, be sure to preserve all of the oil, wine and herbs from the marinade.

Costolette di abbacchio alla scottaditoCostolette di abbacchio alla scottadito

Serve the costolette finger-burning hot, with the roasted potatoes on the side.

Costolette di abbacchio alla scottadito

Posted in Meat, Fish and Legumes, Recipes and Wine Pairings | Tagged , | 4 Comments