Summer finally arrived in Minneapolis, and the gorgeous, hot weather had us craving seafood.  A zuppa di pesce appetizer with prosecco, followed by spaghetti alle vongole as a the first course, gamberi alla griglia as a second course, and white wine from the south of Italy, made for a perfect summer evening dinner.

Zuppa di Pesce
Zuppa, as it sounds, means soup and pesce is Italian for fish and seafood.  A slice of bread toasted on the grill placed at the bottom of the dish absorbs the delicious broth.

Ingredients
Approximately 2 lbs. Seafood Medley, fresh or frozen.  Look for shellfish like clams and mussels, shrimp, squid, scallops.  Avoid crabmeat.
1 clove garlic
2 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. tomato paste
1/2 cup fish stock
1 bunch Italian flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
3 pinches salt
Pepper
Red Pepper
Olive oil
White wine

Cut the clove of garlic into 6-8 pieces, and sauté in olive oil until golden brown.  Add the seafood, butter, tomato sauce, fish stock and wine, salt and if you like a dash of black and red pepper.  Let the mixture simmer for 5-7 minutes, and then turn off heat.

Toast slices of rustic bread in the oven or on the grill.  Place one slice of bread at the bottom of a shallow soup bowl, and spoon the zuppa di pesce over it.  Sprinkle chopped parsley on top.  Serve hot.

Spaghetti alle Vongole
This is one of our all time favorite dishes.  Vongole is the Italian word for clams.  Clams from the Mediterranean are smaller than their cousins in the found in the Atlantic, off of the east coast of the United States.  If you can, buy the Mediterranean ones – they are a little more flavorful and delicate. If you can’t find Mediterranean clams, Littleneck clams work just fine.

Ingredients
2 lbs. clams
1 clove garlic
Olive oil
2 Tbsp. butter
1/2 cup clam stock
1/2 cup white wine
2 pinches salt
1 bunch Italian flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
1 lb. spaghetti

Rinse clams in cold water, and examine them to verify that they are all closed.  Discard any clams that are open; this is a sign that they are bad.  Set clams aside.  Cut the clove of garlic into 6-8 pieces, and sauté in olive oil until golden brown.  Add  clams, clam stock, wine, butter and salt.  Let simmer until all of the clams have opened up and some of the liquids have evaporated, approximately 5-10 minutes.  Remove from heat.

In a separate pot, add spaghetti to boiling, salted water.  (See Methods section for more information about how to salt the pasta water).  Cook until al dente.  Drain.  Return to pot, and add the clam mixture.  Stir gently.  Serve in pasta plates garnished with a sprinkle of parsley.  Remember to put an empty plate or two on the table for the clam shells.

Gamberi alla Griglia
Skewered, grilled king tiger prawn were an easy and delicious end to our seafood dinner.

Ingredients
1 lb king tiger prawn, or fresh, uncooked jumbo shrimp (approximately 20)
Juice of 1 lemon
Wooden or metal skewers

Rinse prawns in cold water.  Place in a bowl.  Squeeze the juice of one lemon over them, and let marinade for approximately 20 minutes.

If you are using wooden skewers, soak them in water before using them to prevent them from burning on the grill.  Place prawns onto skewer by piercing them through their middle.

Place prawn skewers on grill at medium heat for approximately  5 minutes on each side, brushing the remainder of the marinade on them from time to time.

Remove from heat and serve.  You can use fancy silverware to remove the head and shell, or if you are at home with family and friends, just pull it off with your fingers and enjoy.

We began the dinner sipping a nice prosecco called Sergio, from the Veneto region of Italy.  Extra dry and crisp with green apple and citrus aromas, it complimented the shellfish and seafood with its minerality.

Next, we opened a bottle of Falanghina, a wine made in Benevento, in the Campania region of Italy that boasts a long history of seafood cuisine.  Falanghina has quickly become one of our favorite white wines, and this particular 2009 Falanghina from the Cantina del Taburno label was exceptional.   It is slightly sparkling and minerally, with a crisp acidity that allows the wine to pair beautifully with shellfish and crustaceans.

4 thoughts on “Cena di Pesce

  1. What a nice dinner you made! Every dish looks wonderful. I must admit that I have a weakness for zuppa di pesce, so I would probably get a second helping of that.

    • Grazie, Simona! Zuppa di pesce is a special treat, especially for those of us who are land-locked here in Minnesota far away from the seas and oceans. It was so nice to see your comment; we love your blog and find inspiration from it. Your recent post on bietola olio e limone brought us right back to Stefano’s nonna’s kitchen. She was the queen of greens! She grew everything in her garden, and each meal came with cicoria, bietola, or my favorite – cime di rapa.

    • Thank you! If you try it, let us know how it turns out. There is a wonderful variation on this recipe – Tiramisu with limoncello. I will post this recipe sometime, as well.

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